RiRi’s bad!

RiRi’s bad!

lvscombe:

The neighborhood.

Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

Fall. 2Ø14.

Disposable Camera. 35MM. 

Fresh photography by lvscombe
complexmagazine:

Jada and Pac.

complexmagazine:

Jada and Pac.

h0odrich:

basednigel2222:

Amy Winehouse vs Paparazzi 2011.

RIP

amy had the mean dropkick

I refuse to believe this was Amy, but if it was, she should be WWE Divas Champ

shanellbklyn:

radicalrebellion:

If you don’t remember this, you might be too young for this blog

oh what a time to be alive…

Forever & always my shit! Watching this as an adult though, I’ve realized it was a giant ass PSA for safe sex

djsavone:

‘Brown Sugar’October 11, 2002"She was old school, when I was just a shorty…"

What a great era in black cinema

djsavone:

Brown Sugar
October 11, 2002
"She was old school, when I was just a shorty…"

What a great era in black cinema

kindredwisdom:

kindredwisdom:

My Black Father
I am thankful that my black father has never been an absentee dad. Socially, narrative has been designed to negate the strength of the black family. You’d think all black mothers were reckless; you’d think all black fathers ran out on their responsibility. But to be honest, most the kids I knew growing up had a father figure in their lives. Most of them not only knew their birth fathers but would spend time with them. They shared positive memories with their black fathers. Shit, I shared positive memories with many of them and their fathers too. 
Even though my parents separated before I was born, I always knew my father. He was always present. My father spent time with me. He took me places. He took me to my great grandmother’s church, he took me to the playground. He would talk to me about everything from cartoons and drawing to handling bullies to following my dreams.
When I think about black fathers I think of my cousins and their fathers. I have a lot of cousins. All of them knew their fathers and their black fathers were all present. Come to think of it, many of my friends and neighbors growing up in Harlem had their fathers in the picture too. Many of my friends growing up in LA had theirs. Most of them had relationships with their fathers that I witnessed firsthand. Across two coasts, I saw black fathers who were there for their kids.
Of course, there are those men who are irresponsible. But don’t be fooled into believing their blackness was a determining factor. When I moved to the burbs, I knew white kids who had absentee dads. Asian kids and Hispanic kids, etc. whose dads were m.i.a. The point is, the myth about black fathers and their lack of presence in their kids lives needs to stop.
This myth has damaged the perspective of too many. It promotes the stereotype that black men are callous and inhumane. This myth is a part of the reason young children of color are falsely viewed as unwanted and unworthy of the same treatment as their white peers. The idea of abandonment is greater than the reality.
My black father taught me how to ride a bicycle in Central Park when I was six. On Saturday mornings we used to take long bike rides all throughout LA - through Century City and Venice Beach. My black father taught me how to flat iron my hair. My black father would give me cold compresses whenever I had a fever. My black father would take me to the movies and to the CD store after school. My black father gave me hugs and is still my best friend. He was very present then and is very present now. He also happens to be a great Pop Pop. And I appreciate that he is not an anomaly.  
Share your stories about your black father’s positive presence.
#stopthemythoftheabsentblackfather
#stopthemyth
#myblackfather


I’m re-posting in celebration of my Dad’s birthday today.  Happy Birthday, DAD!!! I love you!

Best photo over!!!

kindredwisdom:

kindredwisdom:

My Black Father

I am thankful that my black father has never been an absentee dad. Socially, narrative has been designed to negate the strength of the black family. You’d think all black mothers were reckless; you’d think all black fathers ran out on their responsibility. But to be honest, most the kids I knew growing up had a father figure in their lives. Most of them not only knew their birth fathers but would spend time with them. They shared positive memories with their black fathers. Shit, I shared positive memories with many of them and their fathers too.

Even though my parents separated before I was born, I always knew my father. He was always present. My father spent time with me. He took me places. He took me to my great grandmother’s church, he took me to the playground. He would talk to me about everything from cartoons and drawing to handling bullies to following my dreams.


When I think about black fathers I think of my cousins and their fathers. I have a lot of cousins. All of them knew their fathers and their black fathers were all present. Come to think of it, many of my friends and neighbors growing up in Harlem had their fathers in the picture too. Many of my friends growing up in LA had theirs. Most of them had relationships with their fathers that I witnessed firsthand. Across two coasts, I saw black fathers who were there for their kids.


Of course, there are those men who are irresponsible. But don’t be fooled into believing their blackness was a determining factor. When I moved to the burbs, I knew white kids who had absentee dads. Asian kids and Hispanic kids, etc. whose dads were m.i.a. The point is, the myth about black fathers and their lack of presence in their kids lives needs to stop.


This myth has damaged the perspective of too many. It promotes the stereotype that black men are callous and inhumane. This myth is a part of the reason young children of color are falsely viewed as unwanted and unworthy of the same treatment as their white peers. The idea of abandonment is greater than the reality.


My black father taught me how to ride a bicycle in Central Park when I was six. On Saturday mornings we used to take long bike rides all throughout LA - through Century City and Venice Beach. My black father taught me how to flat iron my hair. My black father would give me cold compresses whenever I had a fever. My black father would take me to the movies and to the CD store after school. My black father gave me hugs and is still my best friend. He was very present then and is very present now. He also happens to be a great Pop Pop. And I appreciate that he is not an anomaly. 


Share your stories about your black father’s positive presence.

#stopthemythoftheabsentblackfather

#stopthemyth

#myblackfather

I’m re-posting in celebration of my Dad’s birthday today.  Happy Birthday, DAD!!! I love you!

Best photo over!!!

dontblameemeka:

9 minutes of Rosie Perez

THRUST!!!

By Any Dreams Necessary y’all

The headphones cost 300 dollars, the phone cost 600 bucks, and they won’t pay 10 dollars for the music. What’s the use of the headphones without the music?
Rza (via paulcantor)

So real!!!!